Polytechnic courses just as good, says Subra

Impressed: Dr Subramaniam (second from left) and Kamalanathan (in blue) looking at an exhibit during the launch of the post-SPM and STPM guidance carnival at Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Politeknik in Shah Alam.

Impressed: Dr Subramaniam (second from left) and Kamalanathan (in blue) looking at an exhibit during the launch of the post-SPM and STPM guidance carnival at Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Politeknik in Shah Alam.

SHAH ALAM: Students who did not do well in theirSijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) should look at other options to continue their tertiary education, said MIC president Datuk Seri Dr S. Subramaniam.

One such option is polytechnic courses, where the number of applicants is still low.

“Those with only two credits in their SPM, the underachievers … these are the people who should apply.

“The Government is giving opportunities to these students to go to a polytechnic. That means they don’t need to have the minimum qualifications but will be given an alternative to enter the stream,” he said at a press conference after opening the post-SPM and STPM (Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia) guidance carnival yesterday.

Also present at the MIC-organised event were Deputy Education Minister Datuk P. Kamalanathan and several MIC leaders, including the party’s deputy president Datuk Seri S.K. Devamany.

Dr Subramaniam noted that those who enrolled in the polytechnic stream could go far in life by having the opportunity to get a diploma or even a degree.

He said there needed to be a change in students’ mindset.

Some, he said, started working and had no interest in further pursuing their academic qualifications while others gave up halfway.

“This is a complex issue. Apart from academic achievements, there is also a social issue that needs a change in mindset so they can make use of the opportunities available to them,” he added.

Dr Subramaniam hoped that students would widen their options to see the courses they could be eligible for.

He said many students applied for the wrong courses and ended up not getting a placement due to their results.

“We have seen this happening: their results are okay – not too good or bad – but because they have chosen the wrong course, they end up not getting any courses at all.

“They need to know, with their results, the kind of courses they can apply and have a high chance of placement,” he added.

Source: The Star