Top scorers who beat the odds

Sabah Education director Datuk Jame Alip (fourth from right) posing with the students who score 10As in their SPM after the results were announced in Kota Kinabalu. – Photos: NORMIMIE DIUN/The Star

Sabah Education director Datuk Jame Alip (fourth from right) posing with the students who score 10As in their SPM after the results were announced in Kota Kinabalu. – Photos: NORMIMIE DIUN/The Star

KOTA KINABALU: Wanting her parents to have a better life spurred a student to aim for straight As in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM).

Joriana Ginawoi, 18, of SM Lok Yuk, Kota Kinabalu who was among Sabah’s top SPM scorers, started crying after obtaining eight A+ and two As.

“My parents always encouraged me to do my best in my studies and whenever I face difficulties or feel stressed from studying, my father would tell me about his life as a child,” said the eldest of three siblings.

She said her father came from a poor family of nine children in Papar near here.

“Despite this my father managed to obtain a scholarship and enter university.

“My father told me that with all the benefits I enjoy, it would be shame not to make the most of it and obtain good results,” she said.

Joriana added she wanted to obtain straight As so she could get a scholarship to pursue her studies and become a doctor.

She made it a point to study and revise everyday, and pose questions to her teachers and friends if she was unsure about something.

“I want to make my parents proud and I am happy I have done well,” said Joriana

Avid gamer Jesper Leonard Vun Kien Fung who also got 10As, attributed his success to his late father and mother who have been a source of inspiration and motivation.

“My dad died three years ago and my mum had to look after me and my two brothers,” said the SMK Sung Siew, Sandakan student.

Jesper said his father, who was a lorry driver and mechanic, always advised his children to study hard if they did not want to have a difficult life like him.

“Seeing my mum struggle to make ends meet by working as a clerk made me start focusing on my studies,” Jesper said, adding he still plays games but only during weekends.

Source: The Star

Advertisements

‘No excuse for teacher to hit pupil

 

SHAH ALAM: The action of a teacher who allegedly beat up a primary school pupil is disappointing and “should not have happened”, said deputy education minister Datuk P. Kamalanathan (pic).

“Whatever the situation is, I don’t think the teacher should have taken such action against the child.

“Let me get the investigation reports and upon getting the reports, we will surely take action against the teacher,” Kamalanathan told reporters after opening the post-Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) andSijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM) guidance carnival yesterday.

The Year Six pupil claimed to have been choked, stomped on and slapped by the teacher for riding a bicycle with a modified handlebar in the 7.30am incident last Wednesday.

Kamalanathan said the teacher should have either taken the pupil for counselling or informed the parents.

“If there is a problem with the child, counsel the child, if the student does not listen then call the parents,” he added.

During an event in Kuala Nerang in Kedah yesterday, Minister Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid said the ministry had directed the school management and Kuala Muda District Education Office to solve the case in a harmonious way.

Bernama quoted Mahdzir as saying that the ministry also wanted the school to submit a report on the matter for further action.

“We want the headmaster to be the mediator between the teacher and the pupil’s parents to find a way to solve the issue in a harmonious way. That is the best solution,” he said.

The boy has claimed he was a few minutes late to his school in Tikam Batu, near Sungai Petani, on Wednesday morning when he was caught by the teacher who is a student affairs senior assistant.

The student also claimed that his teacher beat him up and then gave him RM2 to keep quiet about it.

The boy’s father said his son’s face was swollen and he had bruises on his neck, right leg and left knee.

The father said he lodged a report at the Kuala Muda district police headquarters in Sungai Petani and also took his son for medical treatment.

Sumber : The Star

http://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2016/03/07/no-excuse-for-teacher-to-hit-pupil-if-there-is-a-problem-counsel-the-child-or-inform-parents-says-ka/

Polytechnic courses just as good, says Subra

Impressed: Dr Subramaniam (second from left) and Kamalanathan (in blue) looking at an exhibit during the launch of the post-SPM and STPM guidance carnival at Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Politeknik in Shah Alam.

Impressed: Dr Subramaniam (second from left) and Kamalanathan (in blue) looking at an exhibit during the launch of the post-SPM and STPM guidance carnival at Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Politeknik in Shah Alam.

SHAH ALAM: Students who did not do well in theirSijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) should look at other options to continue their tertiary education, said MIC president Datuk Seri Dr S. Subramaniam.

One such option is polytechnic courses, where the number of applicants is still low.

“Those with only two credits in their SPM, the underachievers … these are the people who should apply.

“The Government is giving opportunities to these students to go to a polytechnic. That means they don’t need to have the minimum qualifications but will be given an alternative to enter the stream,” he said at a press conference after opening the post-SPM and STPM (Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia) guidance carnival yesterday.

Also present at the MIC-organised event were Deputy Education Minister Datuk P. Kamalanathan and several MIC leaders, including the party’s deputy president Datuk Seri S.K. Devamany.

Dr Subramaniam noted that those who enrolled in the polytechnic stream could go far in life by having the opportunity to get a diploma or even a degree.

He said there needed to be a change in students’ mindset.

Some, he said, started working and had no interest in further pursuing their academic qualifications while others gave up halfway.

“This is a complex issue. Apart from academic achievements, there is also a social issue that needs a change in mindset so they can make use of the opportunities available to them,” he added.

Dr Subramaniam hoped that students would widen their options to see the courses they could be eligible for.

He said many students applied for the wrong courses and ended up not getting a placement due to their results.

“We have seen this happening: their results are okay – not too good or bad – but because they have chosen the wrong course, they end up not getting any courses at all.

“They need to know, with their results, the kind of courses they can apply and have a high chance of placement,” he added.

Source: The Star

Opting for local courses

Dr Michael Yap (right) and Dr Chong sharing the views on the response by visitors at the fair.

Dr Michael Yap (right) and Dr Chong sharing the views on the response by visitors at the fair.

KDU Penang University College vice-chancellor Dr Chong Beng Keok saidstudents and parents were more cautious with their money due to the weakening economy.

“Travelling between states in the country can even be a financial burden to those families struggling to make ends meet.

“Hence, most Penangites would prefer to further their studies in the state rather than studying abroad to reduce the burden on their family,” she said during the Star Education Fair 2016 at the Subterranean Penang Internation-al Convention and Exhibition (SPICE) Centre in Bayan Lepas.

INTI International University College principal Dr Michael Yap said the number of students enquiring for locally-based courses increased compared to last year.

“Many students are interested in business studies compared to other fields,” he said.

Dr Yap also said that the fair served as a perfect platform for students to choose their courses under one roof.

SEGi College Penang marketing manager Khor Whuan Lynn agreed that students preferred locally-based programmes.

“Most of them are interestedin business and engineering courses,” she said.

Over at the DISTED College booth, college president and CEO Dr Seah Soo Aun said the response to the fair was overwhelming.

“We had to put out more tables and chairs to cater to the crowd.

“Students are asking more about our A-Levels programme, South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE International), and our business and hospitality programmes,” he said.

Crowds could also be seen at the Tunku Abdul Rahman University College booth.

Its Penang branch campussenior student affairs officer Ng Yi Jiuan said business programmes were the most sought after.

“The younger generation are more interested to be successful entrepreneurs.

“Those who came to our booths were very focussed and clear that entrepreneurship was their ideal career path,” she said.

Other booths which saw a crowd of visitors were the Limkokwing University of Creative Technology, ATIC International College, Equator College, International Medical University, MAHSA University, Management and Science University, Penang Skills Development Centre, Sentral College Penang and The One Academy Penang.

Source: The Star

Generating ideas to make a difference

Dr Imrie delivering his talk on ‘Changing The World Through Idea Generation’ at the Star Education Fair 2016 at SPICE Centre.

Dr Imrie delivering his talk on ‘Changing The World Through Idea Generation’ at the Star Education Fair 2016 at SPICE Centre.

SCHOOL leavers should pursue options which will change the world through creativity and empowerment.

In his talk on ‘Changing The World Through Idea Generation’, KDU Penang University College’s deputy vice-chancellor Dr Brian Charles Imrie said students should be encouraged to hit the ground and start their own business through the generation of ideas and products.

“A 2004 documentary on poor lifestyle choices of fast food, which contributes to all types of ill health, received an Oscar nomination for Best Documentary. It even made over USD$30mil at the box office. This is an example of an idea generation in media production and social impact.

“There are a whole range of opportunities to engage in with creative activities and schoolleavers should choose a university level education which focuses on the creation of ‘thinkers’.

“Choose a college or university that fully supports your ideas to change the world instead of just being a teaching disseminator,” he said in his talk at the Star Education Fair 2016 at SPICE Centre, Bayan Lepas, on Saturday.

INTI International University & Colleges’ career services head Jesus Cuevas Tinawin said when looking for a career, it’s better for one to pursue something they are passionate about, rather than to follow others.

“If one did this, they will excel in their profession.

“One must also choose auniversity which can guarantee a job when they have graduated,” he said in his talk, titled ‘How To Best Equip Yourself In The Competitive World’.

Tinawin added that students should choose higher institutions, which have collaboration with corporate companies.

In his ‘Choosing the Right Career Pathway’ talk, HELP University’s Career Development Centre CareerSense@HELP director Eric Bryan Amaladas said one should assess his or herself beforeexploring the job market.

“The learning opportunities are vital as you have to meet or volunteer in the profession that you are interested in.

“And finally, plan and put your decision in action,” he said.

School leavers who are opting to study overseas, especially in the United States or United Kingdom, also got an insight of what they have to prepare when submitting their applications in the ‘Criteria to Enter the World’s Best Universities’ talk.

Jonathan Whitehouse, who is now the East Asia director for CATS College (UK), Cambridge School of Visual and Performing Arts, and CATS Academy Boston (USA), under the Cambridge Education Group, said while considering a university, factors such as subjects that are being taught, the expertise offered in the institution and style of teaching, whether it is problem-based or subject-based, have to be considered.

Head of DISTED College’s School of Psychology Foo Pei Lynn in her ‘Career Pathways in Psychology’ session, described what psychology was all about, what study options were available to those keen on pursuing it, what they could expect to learn, and the career opportunities that were available.

In ‘Funding Higher Education’, Star Education Fund manager Susanna Kuan said the fund is offering 241 scholarships worth RM11.4mil, with its 26 partners-in-education this year.

These scholarships cover a wide range of fields and disciplines, from entry-level courses to postgraduate education, professional studies to vocational training.

The scholarships are all bond-free.

The application form can be downloaded from thestar.com.my/edufund.

The other speakers on both days of the fair were International Medical University’s (IMU) Clinical School Associate Dean Assoc Prof Nazimah Idris, Sarawak General Hospital general surgeon Dr James Khaw and Penang National Higher Education Fund Corporation (PTPTN) general manager Raja Syahriman.

On Sunday, promoting American Degree Programmes from a partnership between Troy University in Alabama, United States and SEGi College Penang was Troy University’s international recruiter Christopher Thomas Miller.

Also pointing out education opportunities in Australia and United Kingdom were AUG Student Services regional operations and marketing director James Kon and Cambridge Ruskin International College marketing manager Rebecca Chong respectively.

MAHSA University’s pre-university studies and American degree programme director Dr James Walsh, Study Excel Sdn Bhd general manager Jerry Tan, Sentral College Penang School of Computing and IT head Nel Ng, The One Academy Penang head of Multimedia Design Leong Wai Khong, Equator College vice-principal Dr William Wong, Quest International University Perak head of department Assoc Prof Dr Vilasini Pillai, Universiti Sains Malaysia’s engineering professor and delegation head of the Engineering Accreditation Council Prof Datuk Dr Eric Goh and Penang Skills Development Centre’s School of Engineering dean Tham Kok Kee were the other speakers.

Source: The Star

Melting pot for further education

A huge crowd making enquiries at the Disted College booth during the Star Education Fair 2016 at SPICE Centre, Penang.

A huge crowd making enquiries at the Disted College booth during the Star Education Fair 2016 at SPICE Centre, Penang.

Many school leavers at the fair seemed to know what they want, and some of them are aiming for altruistic pursuits.

“I want to study renewable energy, but I can’t find such a specific course,” V. Roshinie, 18, said rather glumly.

Nevertheless, she was privileged to consult many education specialists at the fair who advised her to pick a bachelor’s degree in engineering and focus on her passion when she was allowed to do her own research in the final year.

“I have decided to major in chemical engineering and go from there,” Roshinie declared.

Nur Najeeyah Zainal, 18, is one step closer to her dream of saving lives after applying for a medical degree scholarship at the fair held in SPICE Centre.

Hui Jing (left) and Qian Ying looking at a SEGi College brochure.

Hui Jing (left) and Qian Ying looking at a SEGi College brochure.

Scoring nine As in SPM, she learnt that she could get a partial scholarship from Ramsay Sime Darby Healthcare College and quickly applied.

“I have always dreamed of becoming a doctor but the degree costs so much. This scholarship might be my chance,” she said yesterday.

Penangites Yang Hui Ying, 18, and Low Qian Ying, 18, want to remain in the state and have chosen degrees that focus onbusiness and tourism to play a part in Penang’s growth.

Yang wants a business degree while it will be either a hotel management or a business degree for Low.

Teacher Mohd Salim Mohd Yusoof (left) and his family taking a wefie with the Trojan mascot, who is promoting the America Degree Program from Troy University and SEGi College Penang.

Teacher Mohd Salim Mohd Yusoof (left) and his family taking a wefie with the Trojan mascot, who is promoting the America Degree Program from Troy University and SEGi College Penang.

“We want to remain in Penang and coming here helped us to understand our options better,” Yang said.

Over 90 educational institutions from Malaysia and abroad had assembled at the fair.

Star Media Group Berhad has played a major role in helping students get their dreams too. Since the Star Education Fund was started 22 years ago, 3,432 scholarships of over RM101mil have been awarded.

Source: The Star

Kampung folk sell their homestay in English

GEORGE TOWN: Customers will not just walk in even if you open your doors widely. You need to sell, but even if you have your selling skills down pat, imagine how hard it must be to do it in a language you are not used to.

That was the case here yesterday for 35 homestay operators from Kampung Lahar Yooi, a hinterland of padi fields stretching to the horizon 10km from Butterworth.

Their assignment was, using only English, to sell their homestays to foreign tourists.

“It’s my first time talking to Mat Salleh (Caucasians)! I’m so nervous,” Norliah Abdul Rani muttered just before she readied a book describing her kampung and pitched her homestay to Australians Justin and Lucy Hughes at the Esplanade.

As she went on in English, she was rewarded by their nods of understanding.

“Phew! I calmed down when they started nodding. I enjoyed it very much,” Norliah, 59, smiled.

The group has been learning English since December under a programme by the Prime Minister’s Department’s Implementation Coordination Unit with cooperation from the Bayan Baru Community College.

The trip here yesterday – Penang Educational Visit – was meant as a practical lesson.

They went around the Esplanade, Penang Botanic Gardens and several other tourist hotspots.

Their English coach, Fatimah Saidin, 43, is an architect who has been teaching English to college students for 10 years.

Although Lahar Yooi offered a delightful rustic holiday experience, Fatimah said the homestay operators had been targeting only Malaysian guests and it was hoped that arming them with a practical command of English would lead them to tap into foreign markets.

“I focus on core English components like grammar and vocabulary. They are quite weak in these two.

“It is all about stringing up clear sentences especially when greeting, answering enquiries and giving directions,” Fatimah said.

Her main concern, she added, was not their ability to learn but to find time for lessons because of their other commitments but was happy with the results here.

Source: The Star